Tuesday, October 11, 2016

New ROOF!!!

Yep, that's right.  We're having to put a new roof on this mobile home renovation.  We won't be completely tearing off the old roof, we'll just be putting a new roof over the top of the old one.  And the reason for our haste is because with the recent rains that we've had, we discovered leaks coming in through the roof.  In all of our replacing of rot, tearing out and re-framing of the interior and exterior walls, the roof has flexed so much that things just aren't as sealed and connected as they were before we started.  We knew this was coming from the beginning, we were hoping to be able to do it later but with these new leaks we decided that before we put new materials on the walls like insulation and drywall we should probably fix the leak situation.  We definitely don't want for any of our new materials to get ruined because of leaks! 




Pictured right is our roof before. The new addition roof on the left and the old mobile home roof on the right after 2 coats of aluminum protectant. You can also see Mike up there helping TJ get the measurements lined out. We're so thankful for his help!












The first step was to set a 2x4 ridge on the peak of the roof.  As you can see, these are blocked with small cuts of 2x4 to connect each piece together.  We used 3 inch ring shank nails.  We used 10 foot 2x4's, and the ridge took about 8 2x4's.


These rafters were placed directly on top of the existing rafters in the ceiling of the house.  We used the same 3 inch ring shank nails to nail these rafters through the roof into the existing ceiling rafters.  Since the existing roof metal was in such bad shape, not all of the new rafters were able to sit flush, as you can see the gaps above.  So 6 inch lag screws were used on every other rafter to screw them into the top plate of the exterior walls.  This is to ensure the wind doesn't budge our new roof.  These rafters are set roughly 2 feet apart to match the existing rafters in the ceiling but not every rafter was exactly 2 feet apart.  We used roughly 80 10-foot 2x4's for the rafters.  The overhang you see above will be trimmed in the end to accommodate fascia board, but we plan to leave about a foot overhang to help with water runoff.




The notch pictured above was cut in every rafter in 4 spots to support the furring strips.  These cuts made the job very time consuming.  A miter saw was used to make these notches.  We went with 1x3 furring strips to save on cost. 



Above you can see the furring strips running across the rafters.  They are 1x3x8 and about 120 of these were used.


Here's the roof with pretty much all of the lumber in place!  Now we're ready for metal! 


Above you can see the overhang before we added the fascia. 


And above you can see the overhang after it was trimmed, and fascia was installed.  This is just added protection for the rafters from moisture. The fascia was made out of 14 foot 2x6's.  A router was used to cut a groove for the soffit.

 
We used 50 sheets of 9 foot R-Panel to cover the roof, 25 sheets on each side.  They were fastened to the furring strips with metal roofing screws. Close to 1,000 screws were used.  Each sheet of metal was fitted from the bottom up using a piece of 2x4 to get exactly 1 1/2 inch overhang past the fascia, to help with water runoff.  Each sheet of metal has to be screwed down to the furring strips, so for that reason, and for safety purposes, it's best to only put in place a couple of sheets at a time while you are screwing them in.  This will help you to keep track of where the furring strips are as you are putting in your screws.


  There are 2 plumbing vents, 1 in each bathroom that sticks up out of the roof.  Holes had to be cut in the metal to accommodate these.  We used a rubber flashing to seal these vent pipes to protect against leaks.  They applied a bead of silicone at the bottom of the boot and put in lots of screws to hold in place.

 Pictured above is the house before the new roof.


And here is the house after the new roof.  In total, it took about 10 days to install.  We love the way our new roof looks!  And best of all, we have added piece of mind that we shouldn't have any more leaks (we'll have to wait for a good rain to check!), and HOPEFULLY it'll help with our electric bill.  We're putting a lid on this mobile home renovation a little at a time! 


42 comments:

  1. We are trying to save for a new roof for our 16 wide mobile home. Can you tell me roughly how much you payed in material? Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey! Well, we scoured Craigslist and compared prices everywhere in town for our materials, but it probably cost us around $2500 total, just a rough estimate. If you do end up doing your roof let us know how it goes! Good luck!

      Delete
  2. Do you have photos of the trim of the new roof? I'm interested in the drip edges, how you framed the ends of the home, etc. We have a very similar home and are looking to do a roof like yours over the next few months. What would you do differently if you could?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well technically the fascia will be our trim, we haven't gotten around to painting it yet, I'll post all of that when we get done with it. We don't have the drip edges up yet. And my husband says if he could go back and had more money he would've decked it with OSB before putting the RPanel down to give it more strength. Good luck with your roof!

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  4. getting ready to do the same to my mobile how do you like it so far ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We love our new roof! Granted, we're still working on the inside and aren't fully moved in yet, but no leaks so far! I highly recommend it.

      Delete
  5. This is the best blog on renovations I've seen for mobile homes! Thank you....Please share all of your renovations as we recently bought an older one and want it to look like a house.We are downsizing from our cape cod we built....I love my house and just want to pull in the driveway and feel that same feeling...ahhh home <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Susie! I will definitely keep posting our projects here as we get them done. We've got so much in the works for the inside but it's taking FOR-EVER! Good luck with your reno! You'll have to come back and let us know how it goes.

      Delete
  6. Were you concerned about the weight added to the structure and how the exterior walls would hold up, especially if you added osb decking?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, because everything is connected to the existing trusses. We don't feel like the weight would be too much for our single wide.

      Delete
  7. Are you going to be posting anything else about your remodel.It's been 7 months since your last post.Just curious on how it's going.My husband & I are going to be doing the same renovations​. Well, I wanted to see what your final project looks like. Thanks from Navarre, Fl.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! We definitely will, we just haven't been able to work on it hardly at all since the last post. I promise to blog about it through when we get started again, hopefully soon! We're in the middle of Electrical still and then we'll need to do insulation. Stay tuned!

      Delete
    2. OH,TRUST ME!! I'M STAYING TUNED IN TO THIS CHANNEL HAHA. I'VE LOOKED EVERYWHERE ON THIS INTERNET TO TRY TO FIND SOMEONE REMODELING THEIR MOBILE HOME.I WAS SOOO EXCITED WHEN I FOUND YOUR WEBSITE!!SO NO I'M HERE TO THE END LOL.Y'ALL KEEP UP THE FABULOUS WORK Y'ALL ARE DOING!!!

      Delete
  8. R those 2 X 4 walls or 2 X 6 walls that the trailer Has? Ours have 2x4 walls didn't know if they would be able to hold the weight of the roof.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our outer walls are 2x4, and the roof was built over the existing trusses.

      Delete
  9. How did you connect the ridge board to the peak of the existing roof? For that matter, how did you keep it straight? Lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They used string line to get it all lined up and 3 inch framing nails to nail them to the existing trusses. Hope that helps!

      Delete
  10. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi. We are going to be doing the same thing with our mobile home. Can you tell me what size yours is? Ours is a 14 x 76 and I am comparing what we are working with. Yours looks great by the way.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I have just went through every post here and I LOVE it! My father and I are looking into buying a mobile home to strip, renovate, and rent. This is the only blog I have found that provide details of each step of the process. I'd love to see your finished product!

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Love your blog and it gave me ample ideas on how to best replace our roof. I was counting the costs of either repair or replacement, but seeing how old our roof was, it's more cost effective to just buy new ones. It's a blessing that my two boys are adept at carpentry so we were able to save on professional carpentry fees. They also installed some roof sealer to make the whole roof sturdy. For more tips and guidelines, see this awesome link: http://modularhomeblog.com/diy/mobile-home-roof-sealer.html

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hard to tell from the pictures,but was this a rounded roof you changed to pitched? Have searched everywhere for info on what you have done here. Thank you for sharing! I'm inspired!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, it was pitched, but the roof was so cheap that it just didn’t look defined. The roof started leaking and needed to be repaired so instead of completely replacing it, we put a roof over. The thinking was that it would be an extra layer of protection while giving us a more reliable roof.

      Delete
  17. Just wondering why you did not insulate

    ReplyDelete
  18. All the contents you mentioned in post is too good and can be very useful. I will keep it in mind, thanks for sharing the information keep updating, looking forward for more posts.Thanks HeatonBrosRoof

    ReplyDelete
  19. I am not much into reading, but somehow I got to read lots of articles on your blog. Its amazing how interesting it is for me to visit you very often. Gutter Repair

    ReplyDelete
  20. Falling leaves or pine needles can end up in valleys of your roof where they can hold in moisture and rot the tiles making them weak and allowing rain water to soak through doing further damage to the structure of your roof. pop up shelter

    ReplyDelete
  21. If your roof has chimneys, dormers, and walls, then you will see flashing on your estimate. Flashing prevents water from seeping behind and under shingles, causing water damage to the structure.
    roofing contractor

    ReplyDelete
  22. In addition, falling branches can gouge the roof and damage roofing tiles. By trimming those branches before they can do damage you are protecting your roof by using preventive measures.Local roofers

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hey Maciej Kiersnowski! Hope you are fine. I m in love with your great services. May I meet you personally? Maciej Kiersnowski

    ReplyDelete
  24. In the event that the harm caused to the rooftop is an outrageous one, for example a break, and you wish to get it repaired at the earliest opportunity, at that point you may have a fairly intense time getting your rooftop repaired. Decorative Concrete Patio NH

    ReplyDelete
  25. This can not be more wrong. If you want to be in the form of tip tiles, then you have to replace the shingles and are damaged.news

    ReplyDelete
  26. I love the way you write and share your niche! Very interesting and different! Keep it coming! roofing contractor durham

    ReplyDelete
  27. it does not eliminate the risk of damage and the help was not only you, to look indoors for your best stay, and better conditionsroofing contractor durham

    ReplyDelete
  28. Right then and there, you additionally understood that it was the uncommonly sharp looking roof that has drawn your consideration gutters durham

    ReplyDelete
  29. I simply laid down 2 inch 4x8 sheets of white stiff styrofoam and screwed the metal over it. It's payed for it self in my heating cooling in savings. Of course I have all the trim to dress it out and a one foot over hang.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Rooftop Restoration isn't just enhances the quality and life span of your rooftop, it likewise builds the estimation of your home and enhance appearance. Click Here

    ReplyDelete
  31. There are many different types of insulation available on the market today. We can choose from Fibreglass, cellulose, spray foam, and radiant foil sheeting or barrier. So with all those choices how does one go about choosing the right insulation or combination? Insulation

    ReplyDelete